Dating spode porcelain together christian dating

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Robert Copeland carried out the most reliable and detailed research of backstamps used by the company and his 'marks book' is a necessary requirement for the serious collector!Start of the Spode business to 1833: the company was known as Spode.Pieces were not always marked and sometimes just a pattern number appears and no Spode name at all.Painted marks are often in red and marks can also appear printed usually in blue or black, (although other colours were used) or impressed into the clay so appearing colourless.Here it is carefully looked after and is accessible to the public.Please visit my page The Spode Archive for On this page, below, you will find links to my relevant blogposts about finding out about your Spode and Copeland pieces.

Information about Spode and Copeland history can be found in the large Spode archive which is deposited at the Stoke on Trent City Archives.

This though can only be a guide to a date - it is not an exact science and some backstamps were used for many, many years.

Learning about styles and shapes can also help date pieces, particularly on the older pieces from the early 1800s when many were not marked.

Spode’s Felspar Porcelain is recognised as the forerunner of all modern English Bone China.

As the technique for transfer printing on earthenwares was perfected, Spode’s blue and white transfer printed wares were generally considered to be among the finest ever made.

The factory was modernized in 1923, which included the addition of electric power.

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